Mobile devices or cloud as a solution to the enterprise security pandemic? Half right.

This is a response to Steven Sinofsky’s blog post, “Why Sony’s Breach Matters”. While I agree with parts of his thesis – the parts about layers of complexity leaving us where we are, and secured, legacy-free mobile OS’s helping alleviate this on the client side, I’m not sure I agree with his points about the cloud being a path forward – at least in any near term, or to the degree of precision he alludes to.

The bad news is that the Sony breach is not unique. Not by a long shot. It’s not the limit. It’s really the beginning. It’s the shot across the bow for companies that will let them see one example of just how bad this can get. Of course, they should’ve been paying attention to Target, Home Depot, Michaels, and more by this point already.

Instead, the Sony breach is emblematic of the security breaking point that has become increasingly visible over the last 2 years. It would be the limit if the industry turned a corner tomorrow and treated security like their first objective. But it won’t. I believe what I’ve said before – the poor security practices demonstrated by Sony aren’t unique. They’re typical  of how too many organizations treat security. Instead of trying to secure systems, they grease the skids just well enough to meet their compliance bar, turning an eye to security that’s just “too hard”.

 

While the FBI has been making the Sony attack sound rather unique, the only unique aspect of this one, IMHO, is the scale of success it appears to have achieved. This same attack could be replayed pretty easily. A dab of social engineering… a selection of well-chosen exploits (they’re not that hard to get), and Windows’ own management infrastructure appears to have been used to distribute it.

 

I don’t necessarily see cloud computing yet as the holy grail that you do. Mobile? Perhaps.

 

The personal examples you discussed were all interesting examples, but indeed were indicative of more of a duct-tape approach, similar to what we had to do with some things in Windows XP during the security push that led up to XPSP2 after XPSP1 failed to fill the holes in the hull of the ship. A lot of really key efforts, like run as non-admin just couldn’t have been done in a short timeframe to work with XP – had to be pushed to Vista (where they honestly still hurt users) or Windows 7 where the effort could be taken to really make them work for users from the ground up. But again, much of this was building foundations around the Win32 legacy, which was getting a bit sickly in a world with ubiquitous networking and everyone running as admin.

 

I completely agree as well that we’re long past adding speed bumps. It is immediately apparent, based upon almost every breach I can recall over the past year, that management complexity as a security vector played a significant part in the breach.

If you can’t manage it, you can’t secure it. No matter how many compliance regs the government or your industry throws at you. It’s quite the Gordian knot. Fun stuff.

 

 

I think we also completely agree about how the surface area exposed by today’s systems is to blame for where we are today as well. See my recent Twitter posts. As I mentioned, “systems inherently grow to become so complex nobody understands them.” – whether you’re talking about programmers, PMs, sysadmins, or compliance auditors.

 

 

I’m inclined to agree with your point about social and the vulnerabilities of layer 8, and yet we also do live in a world where most adults know not to stick a fork into an AC outlet. (Children are another matter.)

Technology needs to be more resilient to user-error or malignant exploitation, until we can actually solve the dancing pigs problem where it begins. Mobile solves part of that problem.

 

When Microsoft was building UAC during Longhorn -> Vista, Mark Russinovich and I were both frustrated that Microsoft wasn’t really doing anything with Vista to really nail security down, and so we built a whitelisting app at Winternals to do this for Windows moving forward. (Unfortunately, Protection Manager was crushed for parts after our acquisition, and AppLocker was/is too cumbersome to accomplish this for Win32. Outside of the longshot of ditching the Intel processor architecture completely, whitelisting is the only thing that can save Win32 from the security mayhem it is experiencing at the moment.

 

I do agree that moving to hosted IaaS really does nothing for an organization, except perhaps drive them to reduce costs in a way that on-premises hosting can’t.

But I guess if there was one statement in particular that I would call out in your blog as something I heartily disagree with, it’s this part:

 

“Everyone has moved up the stack and as a result the surface area dramatically reduced and complexity removed. It is also a reality that the cloud companies are going to be security first in terms of everything they do and in their ability to hire and maintain the most sophisticated cyber security groups. With these companies, security is an existential quality of the whole company and that is felt by every single person in the entire company.”

 

This is a wonderful goal, and it’ll be great for startups that have no legacy codebase (and don’t bring in hundreds of open-source or shared libraries that none of their dev team understands down to the bottom of the stack). But most existing companies can’t do what they should, and cut back the overgrowth in their systems.

I believe pretty firmly that what I’ve seen in the industry over the last decade since I left Microsoft is also, unfortunately, the norm – that management – as demonstrated by Sony’s leadership in that interview, will all too often let costs win over security.

 

For organizations that can redesign for a PaaS world, the promise offered by Azure was indeed what you’ve suggested – that designing new services and new applications for a Web-first world can lead to much more well-designed, refined, manageable, and securable applications and systems overall. But the problem is that that model only works well for new applications – not applications that stack refinement over legacy goo that nobody understands. So really, clean room apps only.

The slow uptake of Azure’s PaaS offerings unfortunately demonstrates that this is the exception, and an ideal, not necessarily anything that we can expect to see become the norm in the near future.

 

Also, while Web developers may not be integrating random bits of executable code into their applications, the amount of code reuse across the Web threatens to do the same, although the security perimeter is winnowed down to the browser and PII shared within it. Web developers can and do grab shared .js libraries off the Web in a heartbeat.

Do they understand the perimeter of these files? Absolutely not. No way.

Are the risks here as big as those posed by an unsecured Win32 perimeter? Absolutely not – but I wouldn’t trivialize them either.

There are no more OS hooks, but I’m terrified about how JS is evolving to mimic many of the worst behaviors that Win32 picked up over the years. The surface has changed, as you said – but the risks – loss of personal information, loss of data, phishing, DDOS, are so strikingly similar, especially as we move to a “thicker”, more app-centric Web.

 

Overall, I think we are in for some changes, and I agree with what I believe you’ve said both in your blog and on Twitter, that modern mobile OS’s with a perimeter designed in them are the only safe path forward. The path towards a secure Web application perimeter seems less clear, far less immediate, and perhaps less explicit than your post seemed to allude to.

 

There is much that organizations can learn from the Sony breach.

 

But will they?

 

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