Bring your own stuff – Out of control?

The college I went to had very small cells… I mean dorm rooms. Two people to a small concrete walled-room, with a closet, bed, and desk that mounted to the walls. The RA on my floor (we’ll call him “Roy”) was a real stickler about making us obey the rules – no televisions or refrigerators unless they were rented from the overpriced facility in our dorm. After all, he didn’t want anybody creating a fire hazard.

But in his room? A large bench grinder and a sanding table, among other toys. Perhaps it was a double standard… but he was the boss of the floor – and nobody in the administration knew about it.

Inside of almost every company, there are several types of Roy, bringing in toys that could potentially harm the workplace. Most likely, the harm will come in the form of data loss or a breach, not a fire as it might if they brought in a bench grinder. But I’m really starting to get concerned that too many companies aren’t mindful of the volume of toys that their own Roys have been bringing in.

Basically, there are three types of things that employees are bringing in through rogue or personal purchasing:

  • Smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices (BYOD)
  • Standalone software as a service
  • Other cloud services

It’s obvious that we’ve moved to a world where employees are often using their own personal phones or tablets for work – whether it becomes their main device or not. But the level of auditing and manageability offered by these devices, and the level of controls that organizations are actively enforcing on them, all leave a lot to be desired. I can’t fathom the number of personal devices today, most of them likely equipped with no passcode or a weak one, that are currently storing documents that they shouldn’t be. That document that was supposed to be kept only on the server… That billing spreadsheet with employee salaries or patient SSNs… all stored on someone’s phone, with a horrible PIN if one at all, waiting for it to be lost or stolen.

Many “freemium” apps/services offer just enough rope for an employee to hang their employer with. Sign up with your work credentials and work with colleagues – but your management cannot do anything to manage them – without (often) paying.

Finally, we have developers and IT admins bringing in what we’ll call “rogue cloud”. Backing up servers to Azure… spinning up VMs in AWS… all with the convenience of a credit card. Employees with the best of intentions can smurf their way through, getting caught by internal procedures or accounting. A colleague tells a story about a CFO asking, “Why are your developers buying so many books?” The CFO was, of course, asking about Amazon Web Services, but had no idea, since the charges were small irregular amounts every month across different developers, from Amazon.com. I worry that the move towards “microservices” and cloud will result in stacks that nobody understands, that run from on-premises to one or more clouds – without an end-to-end design or security review around them.

Whether we’re talking about employees bringing devices, applications, or cloud services, the overarching problem here is the lack of oversight that so many businesses seem to have over these rapidly growing and evolving technologies, and the few working options they have to remediate them. In fact, many freemium services are feeding on this exact problem, and building business models around it. “I’m going to give your employees a tool that will solve a problem they’re having. But in order for you to solve the new problem that your employees will create by using it, you’ll need to buy yet another tool, likely for everybody.”

If you aren’t thinking about the devices, applications, and services that your employees are bringing in without you knowing, or without you managing them, you really might want to go take a look and see what kinds of remodeling they’ve been doing to your infrastructure without you noticing. Want to manage, secure, integrate, audit, review, or properly license the technology your employees are already using? You may need to get your wallet ready.

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