Compute Stick PCs – Flash in the pan?

A few years ago, following the success of many other HDMI-connected computing devices, a new type of PC arrived – the “compute stick”. Also referred to sometimes as an HDMI PC or a stick PC, the device immediately made me scratch my head a bit.

If Windows 10 still featured a Media Center edition, I guess I could sort of see the point. But Windows, outside of Surface Hub (which seemingly runs a proprietary edition of Windows), no longer features a 10′ UI in the box. Meaning, without third-party software and nerd-porn duct tape, it’s a computer with a TV as a display, and a very limited use case.

Unlike Continuum on Windows 10 Mobile, I’ve never had a licensing boot camp attendee ask me about compute sticks (almost none ever asked us about Windows To Go, the mode of booting Windows Enterprise edition off of USB on a random PC).

The early sticks featured 2GB of RAM or less, really limiting their use case even further. With 4GB, more modern versions will run Windows 10 well, but to what end?

I can see some cases where compute sticks might make sense for point of service, but a NUC is likely to be more affordable, powerful, and expandable, and not suffer from heat exhaustion like a compute stick is likely to.

I’ve also heard it suggested that a compute stick is a good potential for the business traveler. But I don’t get that. Using a compute stick requires you to have a keyboard and pointing device with you, and find an AC power source behind a hotel TV or shared workspace. Now I don’t know about you, but while I used to travel with a keyboard to use with my iPad, I don’t anymore… and I never travel with a spare pointing device. And as to finding AC power behind a hotel TV? Shoot me now.

The stick PC has some use cases, sure. Home theater where the user is willing to assemble the UX they want. But that’s nerd porn, not a primary use case, and not a long-term use case (see Media Center edition).

You eventually reach a point where, if you want a PC while you’re on the go, you should haul a PC with you. Laptops, convertibles, and tablets are ridiculously small, and you don’t always have to tote peripherals with you to make them work.

In short, I can see a very limited segment of use cases where compute sticks make sense. (Frankly, it’s a longer list than Windows To Go.) But I think in most cases, upon closer inspection, a NUC (or larger PC), Windows 10 tablet or laptop, or <gasp/> a Windows 10 Mobile device running Continuum is likely to make more sense.

 

Comments are closed.