Oct 15

Simulated gambling in the App Store? The only winning move is not to play.

From the arrival of Apple’s iPhone App Store, they’ve elected to keep the platform, shall we say, “Family Friendly”.

While the guidelines for developers who elect to sell their software through the App Store are always evolving, they seem much more constant and consistent versus when the store first opened. In general, it’s still about keeping it a warm fuzzy place, while allowing some evolution so the App Store can grow and thrive. Apps which which violate terms include those that offer pornography, violence (simulated or other), targeted defamatory or offensive content at a given race, ethnicity, or or culture, or include objectionable content. What’s objectionable? Ask Apple, as they use the Potter Stewart school of content screening. Things like Metadata+ and Ephemeral+, which provide information unavailable anywhere else, but which could be found “unpleasant” by some, are not available on Apple’s platforms. Personally, the justification of that is ridiculous, but that’s a matter for another day.

Instead, I want to talk about “simulated gambling” games. This week, I found myself on the App Store search page, and noticed among the Trending Searches, the string “777”. As someone who flies regularly (but doesn’t gamble), I was curious what this even was. I clicked, and I couldn’t have been more disappointed. I clicked the link, and discovered an endless parade of “simulated” slot machine games.

What’s really both fascinating and terrifying to me is how much the Trending Searches space seems to include “simulated gambling” titles at night, and how many of the Top Grossing apps in the App Store are simulated gambling.

I really dislike that much of the iOS ecosystem has become overgrown by free-to-play (F2P) apps and games. I’ve started referring to these as free-to-p(l)ay instead, as because they generally require you to pay if you want to actually get to the most desirable content or levels in the title. I’ve only ever interacted with a handful of F2P games, and as a general rule, they are basically a Skinner box that conditions the user into paying for content in order to receive gratification.

Here’s where the problems begin, though. I believe there are basically two ways to classify titles in the App Store that offer in-app purchase (IAP):

  1. À la carte IAP
  2. Bottomless IAP.

À la carte IAP apps offer one price for entry (either free or some base currency), and then a set menu of items that can enable a set collection of functionality within or interconnected to the app. For example, a drawing app could offer a set of pens or brushes, or a range of colors. The point is, a given amount of currency will buy you a set piece of functionality. One could argue that you can IAP subscribe to services and that can be ongoing, but I contend that is still a set currency over time.

Bottomless IAP apps, on the other hand, have an almost endless supply of offers to exchange currency for downloadable content, “lives”, “coins” or other virtual (but financially worthless) tchotchkes to help you progress within the app (game). While the apps may have a cap on how much can be spent over time, many offer ridiculously expensive IAP items that can be repeatedly purchased, ideal for targeting and manipulating impressionable individuals. These are the IAP titles that we’ve all heard about, where people of all ages get duped into paying real dollars, without realizing how big the financial hole is that they’ve created for themselves. Many of these simulated gaming titles offer IAP items up to US$99!

I have two problems with “simulated gambling” apps in the store. In reverse priority order:

  1. They might be violating numerous gaming laws around the world
  2. They are preying upon people, including those dealing with real-world gambling addiction problems.

As a general rule, Apple’s guidelines on apps that include gambling state:

“Apps that offer real money gaming (e.g. sports betting, poker, casino games, horse racing) or lotteries must have necessary licensing and permissions in the locations where the App is used, must be restricted to those locations, and must be free on the App Store.”


“Apps that use IAP to purchase credit or currency to use in conjunction with real money gaming will be rejected”

So “gaming” apps like simulated slot machines are in an interesting wedge. They ride a fine line, seemingly all following the first guideline, and making themselves free for download, but with the opportunity for the consumer to bleed out significant cash through bottomless IAP. They can’t ever convert any winnings in the app to actual real-world winnings, or arguably they’d violate the second term.

Now here’s where things get interesting. Let’s take a look at that first term more closely. These apps are supposed to be licensed according to the location where they are used. This is a distinct problem to me. Though these are “simulated gaming”, I believe that since they are simulated slot machines (among other categories of gambling available in the App Store), they should follow the jurisdiction where they are used.

Thing is, there are very specific rules in many jurisdictions on what the payout must be for a given device used for a given category of game. For example, on the Las Vegas strip on the percentage of cash that must be paid out to gamblers, which ranges from 88.06% (penny slots) to 93.69% (US$1 slots). Arguably, the old line that “the house always wins” isn’t completely true. But statistically, it isn’t going to be you, either.

But these games are all “simulated”. There is literally no opportunity for payout. Any winnings are generally returned as an opportunity to play again. There are no winnings. None. Arguably, by being a “simulation”, these titles do not need to abide by payout terms within the locales they are being used. But as they aren’t real gaming, I personally feel Apple should reconsider having this category of title in the store at all.

Gambling addiction is a real thing. People get sucked in by the lure of easy money, and can quickly lose more than they had to begin with. The National Council on Problem Gambling has an interesting survey, the 2013 National Survey of Problem Gambling Services discusses how much money is spent on gambling addiction services across the U.S. The App Store lets consumers link credit cards to IAP. By offering bottomless IAP, these titles are effectively allowed to shake out the wallets of vulnerable consumers to an extent they cannot financially bear.

The problem with these “games”, is that they play upon the same emotions as real slot machines, luring the consumer into wasting untold dollars on a game that is completely unwinnable, financially. To quote the movie WarGames, “The only winning move is not to play.”

My contention is that if games offering simulated gambling must be allowed on the App Store at all, they should not be allowed to offer bottomless IAP, or perhaps even offer IAP at all. Take a look at this game review from a user of top-tier “simulated slot” game Slotomania from Playtika Games (A division of Caesars Interactive Entertainment):


That makes me so sad. These games offer no redeeming value (literally). From Playtika’s own Terms of Service (linked incorrectly within their App Store entry, by the way):

“The Service may include an opportunity to purchase virtual, in-game currency (“Coins”) that may require you to pay a fee using real money to obtain the Coins. Coins can never be redeemed for real money, goods, or any other item of monetary value from Playtika or any other party. You understand that you have no right or title in the virtual in-game items, spins or Coins.”

These titles are all about killing time while burning your wallet at the same time. They’re all about taking money from the easily impressionable – youth, adults, retirees… across the board. When I posted on Twitter about simulated gambling, a follower of mine replied back with the following:

“grandma uses her iPad 2 almost exclusively for slot apps. :*(“

If Apple is going to hold up the App Store as a family friendly place for commerce, with reasonable consumer protections, I think they need to re-examine what role, if any, simulated gambling apps with IAP are allowed to play there.

Sep 15

The Apple Watch is perfect. On paper.

This week, I’m doing something that I don’t remember ever actually doing before. I’m taking back an Apple device, for a refund.

After spending less than a week with the Apple Watch, I have to say, I’m disappointed. A bit in the device. But more in Apple. The software is simply not done. Perhaps it’s my use of a 5s as the host device for it. Perhaps my expectations are too high. Perhaps I’m right, that it’s not ready for prime time. Regardless, it’s definitely not worth the price of entry in the device’s current condition. As Nilay Patel said, “If you’ll like toys, you’ll like it.

As I checked out at a grocery this week, and performed my first Apple Pay transaction, the  following interchange happened between the cashier and myself:

Her: “Ooh. Is that it (the Watch)?”

Me: “Yes.”

Her: “How do you like it?”

Me: “It’s okay. I’ve only had it for about a day.”

Her: “What can it do?”

Me: <silence/>

I hesitated, struggling to really list out the things that the Watch could do that were relevant to me. It was in that moment that I think I switched from “I think I’ll return it.” to “I’m going to return it.” I understand that apparently most normals are quite happy with their Watches, and that only technophiles (if you can still call me that) like myself found all the foibles in the way the device works.

The Watch isn’t without positive attributes. I just don’t feel that they outweigh the negatives.

What’s good:

  • As a bauble, it is gorgeous. I bought the stainless Watch, with the new, more traditional Saddle Brown Classic Buckle. As a piece of jewelry, I think it looks really good. (Although my 14YO would tell you that my free opinions on style are worth what you pay me for them.)
  • As a watch, it’s pretty good. I mean, it keeps time, and the interchangeable faces are fun for a bit.
  • Given the space, the user interface works pretty well.
  • When it all works, there are some neat conveniences that you can’t do (or can’t do as easily) with an iPhone. Apple Pay and other Wallet (nee Passbook) features on your wrist are handy. But not “OMG!” useful.
  • There’s a pretty amazing supply of Apple Watch apps that already exist. (See caveat to this, below.)

I was really hoping I could come up with some more positive aspects here. But honestly, I’ve run out already.

So… what’s bad about Apple Watch? In no explicit order:

  • It is very expensive, for what it does. My mind boggles that Apple has sold any of the Watch Edition models.
  • Updating sucked. It took over an hour and a half to install the 500MB update from my iPhone. That is inexcusable.
  • It’s heavy. I’ve got tiny T-rex arms, but the weight of the Watch on my ulnar styloid (the bump of bone on the outside of your wrists) was painful after only a few minutes.
  • It’s slow. In tandem with my 5s, there are far too many beach balls waiting for apps to launch. This may get better over time as apps are updated for the new version of the OS. But I fear that it may be indicative of the real resource constraints on such a small device. Time will tell.
  • I had hope that Watch would make my Phone better. That is, it would add utility to my phone. Instead, because of the app model, it made my phone’s battery life horrible.
  • The version of the SpringBoard shell used by the Apple watch is atrocious. I have small fingers, so don’t have much trouble selecting apps. But the UI of the Watch comes the closest to being the “sea of icons” on iOS that Microsoft derided for so long. Doing anything rapidly on the watch with this UI is… complicated.
  • Too many app developers don’t seem to understand what the Watch is, and is not, ideal for. I guess that’s both a good and bad thing. But to the caveat I mentioned earlier, there are a lot of apps for the Watch – many of which aren’t even on Windows Phone. But there’s a lot of crap – it seems many developers are lost in the wilderness.
  • It shows every single fingerprint you place on the face.
  • The packaging for the Apple Watch is… overwhelming. There’s plastic on plastic on plastic. Wrapping device subcomponents in one-time use plastic is horrifically wasteful.

The former product manager (and former development manager) in me sees how we arrived at this point. The Apple Watch team was established long ago, and started on their project. At one point, pressure from above, from outside, from investors, who knows… forced Apple to push up a launch date. The hardware was reasonably ready. But the software was a hot mess.

Traditionally, Apple excelled when they discarded features that weren’t ready, even if competitors already did them in a half-assed way – winning over consumers by delivering those features later when they’re actually ready. Unfortunately, you often get a product manager in the mix that pushes for a feature, even if it can’t really be implemented well or reliably. The Apple Watch feels like this. It offers a mix of checkbox features that, yes, you can argue, kind of work. But they don’t have the finish that they should. The software doesn’t respect the hardware. In fact, it’s giving a middle finger to the hardware. Even WatchOS 2 fails to deliver adequate finish. The list of features that the Watch promises sound nifty. But actually living with the Watch is disappointing. It isn’t what it should be, given the Apple brand on the outside. I expect better from Apple. Maybe next time.

Sep 15

You have the right… to reverse engineer

This NYTimes article about the VW diesel issue and the DMCA made me think about how, 10 years ago next month, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) almost kept Mark Russinovich from disclosing the Sony BMG Rootkit. While the DMCA provides exceptions for reporting security vulnerabilities, it does nothing to allow for reporting breaches of… integrity.

I believe that we need to consider an expansion of how researchers are permitted to, without question, reverse engineer certain systems. While entities need a level of protection in terms of their copyright and their ability to protect their IP, VW’s behavior highlights the risks to all of us when of commercial entities can ship black box code and ensure nobody can question it – technically or legally.

In October of 2005, Mark learned that a putting a particular Sony BMG CD in a Windows computer would result in it installing a rootkit. Simplistically, a rootkit is a piece of software – usually installed by malicious individuals – that sits at a low level within the operating system and returns forged results when a piece of software at a higher level asks the operating system to perform an action. Rootkits are usually put in place to allow malware to hide. In this case, the rootkit was being put in place to prevent CDs from being copied. Basically, a lame attempt at digital rights management (DRM) gone too far.

In late October, Mark researched this, and prepped a blog post outlining what was going on. We talked at length, as he was concerned that his debugging and disclosure of the rootkit might violate the DMCA, a piece of legislation put in place to protect copyrights and prevent reverse engineering of DRM software, among other things. So in essence, to stop exactly what Mark had done. I read over the DMCA several times during the last week of October, and although I’m not a lawyer, I was pretty satisfied that Mark’s actions fit smack dab within the part of the DMCA that was placed there to enable security professionals to diagnose and report security holes. The rootkit that Sony BMG had used to “protect” their CD media had several issues in it, and was indeed creating security holes that were endangering the integrity of Windows systems where the software had unwittingly been installed.

Mark decided to go ahead and publish the blog post announcing the rootkit on October 31, 2005 – Halloween. Within 48 hours, Mark was being pulled in on television interviews, quoted in major press publications, and was repeatedly a headline on Slashdot, the open-source focused news site over the next several months – an interesting occurrence for someone who had spent almost his entire career in the Windows realm.

The Sony BMG disclosure was very important – but it almost never happened. Exceptions that allow reverse engineering are great. But security isn’t the only kind of integrity that researchers need to diagnose today. I don’t think we should tolerate laws that keep researchers from ensuring our systems are secure, and that they operate the way that we’ve been told they do.

Sep 15

How I learned to stop worrying and love the cloud

For years, companies have regularly asked me for my opinion on using cloud-based services. For the longest time, my response was one about, “You should investigate what types of services might fit best for your business,” followed by a selection of caveats reminding them about privacy, risk, and compliance, since their information will be stored off-premises.

But I’ve decided to change my tune.

Beginning now, I’m going to simply start telling them to use cloud where it makes sense, but use the same procedures for privacy, risk, and compliance that they use on-premises.

See what I did there?

The problem is that we’ve treated hosted services (née cloud) as something distinctly different from the way we do things on-premises. But… is it really? Should it be?

It’s hard to find a company today that doesn’t do some form of outsourcing. You’re trusting people who don’t work “for” you with some of your company’s key secrets. Every company I can think of does it. If you don’t want to trust a contract-based employee with your secrets, you don’t give them access, right? Deny them access to your network, key server, or files shares (or SharePoint servers<ahem/>). Protect documents with things like Azure Rights Management. Encrypt data that needs to be protected.

These are all things that you should have been doing anyway, even before you might have had any of your data or operations off-premises. If you had contract/contingent staff, those systems should have been properly secured in order to avoid <ahem/> an overzealous admin (see link above) from liberating information that they shouldn’t really have access to. Microsoft and Amazon (and to a lesser extent at this point), have been putting a lot of effort into securing your data while it lives within their clouds, and that’s going to continue over the next 2-5 years, to the point where, honestly, with a little investment in tech and process – and likely a handful of new subscription services that you won’t be able to leave – you’ll be able to secure data better than you can in your infrastructure today.

Yeah. I said it.

A lot of orgs talk big about how awesome their on-premises infrastructure is, and how uncompromisingly secure it is. And that’s nice. Some of them are right. Many of them aren’t. In the end, in addition to systems and employees you can name, you’re probably relying on a human element of contractors, vendors, part-time employees, “air-gapped” systems that really aren’t, sketchy apps that should have been retired years ago, and security software that promised the world, but that can’t really even secure a tupperware container. We assume that cloud is something distinctly different from on-premises outsourcing of labor. But it isn’t really that different. The only difference is that today, unsecured (or unsecurable) data may have to leave your premises. That will improve over time, if you work at it. The perimeter, like that of smart phones has since 2007, will allow you to secure data flow between systems you own, and on systems you own – whether those live on physical hardware in your datacenter, or in AWS or Azure. But it means recognizing this perimeter shift – and working to reinforce that new perimeter in terms of security and auditing.

Today, we tend to fear cloud because it is foreign. It’s not what we’re all used to. Yet. Within the next 10 years, that will change. It probably already has changed within the periphery (aka the rogue edges) or your organization today. Current technology lets users deploy “personal cloud” tools, whether business intelligence, synchronization, desktop access, and more – without letting you have veto power, unless you own and audit the entirety of your network (and any telecom access), and admin access to all PCs. And you don’t.

The future involves IT being proactive about providing cloud access ahead of rogue users. Deciding where to be more liberal about access to tools than orgs are used to, and being able to secure perimeters that you may not even be aware of. Otherwise, you get to be dragged along on the choose your own adventure that your employees decide on for you.

Aug 15

The curse of the second mover

When I lived in Alaska, there was an obnoxious shirt that I used to see all the time, with a group of sled dogs pictured on it. The cutesy saying on it was, “If you’re not the lead dog, the view never changes.” While driving home last night and considering multiple tech marketplaces today, it came to mind.

Consider the following. If you were:

  1. Building an application for phones and tablets today, whose OS would you build it for first?
  2. Building a peripheral device for smartphones, what device platform would you build it for?
  3. Selling music today, whose digital music store would you make sure it was in first?
  4. Selling a movie today, whose digital video store would you make sure it was in first?
  5. Publishing a book, whose digital book store would you make sure it was in first?

Unless you’ve got a lot of time or money on your hands, and feel like dealing with the bureaucracy of multiple stores, the answer to all of the above is going to be exactly the same.

Except that last one.

If you’re building apps, smartphone peripherals, or selling music or movies, you’re probably building for Apple first. If you’re publishing or self-publishing a book, you’re probably going to Amazon first. One could argue that you might go to Amazon with music or a movie – but I’m not sure that’s true – at least if you wanted to actually sell full-fare copies vs. getting them placed on Prime Music/Prime Instant Video.

In the list above, that doesn’t tell a great tale for second movers. If you’re building a marketplace, you’ve got to offer some form of exceptional value over Apple (or Amazon for 5) in order to dethrone them. You’ve also got to offer something to consumers to get them to use your technology, and content purveyors/device manufacturers to get them to invest in your platform(s).

For the first three, Apple won those markets through pure first mover advantage.

The early arrival of the iPhone and iOS, and the premium buyers who purchase them, ensure that 1 & 2 will be answered “Apple”. The early arrival of the iPod, iTunes, and “Steve’s compromise”, allowing iTunes on Windows – as horrible as the software was/is – ensures that iTunes Music is still the answer to 3.

Video is a squishy one – as the market is meandering between streaming content (Netflix/Hulu), over-the-top (OTT) video services like Amazon Instant Video, MLB At Bat, HBO Now, etc., and direct purchase video like iTunes or Google Play. But the wide availability of Apple TV devices, entrenchment of iTunes in the life of lots of music consumers, and disposable income mean that a video content purveyor is highly likely to hit iTunes first – as we often see happen with movies today.

The last one is the most interesting though.

If we look at eBooks, something interesting happened. Amazon wasn’t the first mover – not by a long shot. Microsoft made their Reader software available back in 2000. But their device strategy wasn’t harmonized with the ideas from the team building the software. It was all based around using your desktop (ew), chunky laptop (eventually chunky tablet), or Windows Pocket PC device for reading. Basically, it was trying to sell eBooks as a way to read content on Windows, not really trying to sell eBooks themselves. Amazon revealed their first Kindle in 2007. (This was the first in a line of devices that I personally loathe, because of the screen quality and flicker when you change pages.) Apple revealed the iPad, and rapidly launched iBooks in 2010, eventually taking it to the iPhone and OS X. But the first two generations of iPad were expensive, chunky device to try and read on, and iBooks not being available on the iPhone and OS X didn’t help. (Microsoft finally put down the Reader products in 2012, just ahead of the arrival of the best Windows tablets…<sigh/>) So even though Apple has a strong device story today, and a strong content play in so many other areas, they are (at least) the second fiddle in eBooks. They tout strong numbers of active iBooks users… but since every user of iOS and OS X can be an iBooks users, numbers mean little without book sales numbers behind them. Although Amazon’s value driven marketplace may not be the healthiest place for authors to publish their wares, it appears to be the number one place by far, without much potential for it to be displaced anytime soon.

If your platform isn’t in the leader for a specific type of content, pulling ahead from second place is going to be quite difficult, unless you’ve somehow found some silver bullet. If you’re in third, you have an incredible battle ahead.

Aug 15

Continuum vs. Continuity – Seven letters is all they have in common

It’s become apparent that there’s some confusion between Microsoft’s Continuum feature in Windows 10, and Apple’s Continuity feature in OS X. I’ve even heard technical people get them confused.

But to be honest, the letters comprising “Continu” are basically all they have in common. In addition to different (but confusingly similar) names, the two features are platform exclusive to their respective platform, and perform completely different tasks that are interesting to consider in light of how each company makes money.

Apple’s Continuity functionality, which arrived first, on OS X Yosemite late in 2014, allows you to hand off tasks between multiple Apple devices. Start a FaceTime call on your iPhone, finish it on your Mac. Start a Pages document on your Mac, finish it on your iPad. If they’re on the same Wi-Fi network, it “just works”. The Handoff feature that switches between the two devices works by showing an icon for the respective app you were using, that lets you begin using the app on the other device. Switching from iOS to OS X is easy. Going the other way is a pain in the butt, IMHO, largely because of how iOS presents the app icon on the iOS login screen.

Microsoft’s Continuum functionality, which arrived in one form with Windows 10 in July, and will arrive in a different (yet similar) form with Windows 10 Mobile later this year, lets the OS adapt to the use case of the device you’re on. On Windows 10 PC editions, you can switch Tablet Mode off and on, or if the hardware provides it, it can switch automatically if you allow it. Windows 10 in Tablet Mode is strikingly similar to, but different from, Windows 8.1. Tablet mode delivers a full screen Start screen, and full-screen applications by default. Turning tablet mode off results in a Start menu and windowed applications, much like Windows 7.

When Windows 10 Mobile arrives later this year, the included incarnation of Continuum will allow phones that support the feature to connect to external displays in a couple of ways. The user will see an experience that will look like Windows 10 with Tablet mode off, and windowed universal apps. While it won’t run legacy Windows applications, this means a Windows 10 Mobile device could act as a desktop PC for a user that can live within the constraints of the Universal application ecosystem.

Both of these pieces of functionality (I’m somewhat hesitant to call either of them “features”, but I digress) provide strategic value for Apple, and Microsoft, respectively. But the value that they provide is different, as I mentioned earlier.

Continuity is sold as a “convenience” feature. But it’s really a great vehicle for hardware lock-in and upsell. It only works with iOS and OS X devices, so it requires that you use Apple hardware and iCloud. In short: Continuity is intended to help sell you more Apple hardware. Shocker, I know.

Continuum, on the other hand, is designed to be more of a “flexibility” feature. It adds value to the device you’re on, even if that is the only Windows device you own. Yes, it’s designed to be a feature that could help sell PCs and phones too – but the value is delivered independently, on each device you own.

With Windows 8.x, your desktop PC had to have the tablet-based features of the OS, even if they worked against your workflow. Your tablet couldn’t adapt well if you plugged it into an external display and tried to use it as a desktop. Your phone was… well… a phone. Continuum is intended to help users make the most of any individual Windows device, however they use it. Want a phone or tablet to be a desktop and act like it? Sure. Want a desktop to deliver a desktop-like experience and a tablet to deliver a tablet-like experience? No problem. Like Continuity, Continuum is platform-specific, and features like Continuum for Windows 10 Mobile will require all-new hardware. I expect that this Fall’s hardware season will likely continue to bring many new convertibles that automatically switch, helping to make the most of the feature, and could help sell new hardware.

Software vendors made Continuity-like functionality before Apple did it, and that’ll surely continue. We’ll see more and more device to device bridging in Android and Windows. However, Apple has an advantage here, with their premium consumer, and owning their entire hardware and software stack.

People have asked me for years if I see Apple making features that look like Continuum. I don’t. At least not trying to make OS X into iOS. We may see Apple try and bridge the tablet and small laptop market here in a few weeks with an iOS device that can act like a laptop, but arguably that customer wouldn’t be a MacBook (Air) customer anyway. It’ll be interesting to see how the iPad evolves/collides into the low-end laptop market.

Hopefully if you were confused about these two features, that helps clarify what they are – and that they’re actually completely different things, designed to accomplish completely different things.

Jun 15

Windows 10 and free. Free answers to frequently asked questions.

I keep hearing the same questions over and over again about Windows 10 and the free* upgrade, so I have decided to put together a set of frequently asked questions about the Windows 10 promotion.

Who gets it?

Q: Is Windows 10 really free?

Yes. It is free. Completely free. But only if you meet the qualifications and take Microsoft up on the offer from a qualified PC before July 29th, 2016.

You must have Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 installed on your x86 or x64 system, and it cannot be an Enterprise edition of Windows (only Home, Pro/Professional, Ultimate, or similar. See the bottom of this page for a significant disclaimer.

Q: Can I get the free upgrade if I have some version of Windows RT?

No free upgrade for you. Microsoft has indicated there’s a little something coming in the pipeline for you at some point, but haven’t indicated what that would be. It won’t be Windows 10, and won’t be the full Windows 10 for smartphones and small tablets either. MHO: Expect something more akin to Windows Phone 7.8.

Q: Can I get it for free if I have Enterprise edition of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1?

No. Enterprise edition must be purchased through the Volume Licensing channel, as it always has had to be. Talk to the people in your organization who handle Windows volume licensing.

Q: Can I get it for free if I’m in the Windows Insider program?

No. There’s no magic program rewarding Windows Insiders with a completely free full product. You have to have upgraded the system from a valid license for 7, 8, or 8.1. (See this tweet from @GabeAul.)

Q: Can I get it for free if I have Windows XP or Windows Vista?

No. You’ll need to either buy a legal copy of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1, or just purchase Windows 10 when it becomes available at retail, supposedly in late August, 2015. Your install of Windows does not qualify for the offer.

Q: Can I get it for free if I pirated Windows 7, 8, or 8.1?

Not really, no. If it was “Non-Genuine” before your upgrade, or Windows 10 recognizes it as such, it will still be Non-Genuine after the fact. You may be upgraded, but expect to be nagged. Your OEM might also be able to help you get legit… Or you could always buy a copy.

Q: Can I perform a clean install of Windows 10?

Yes, but you’ll have to do it after you’ve upgraded from a qualified install of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 first. Then you can perform clean installs on that device at any time. (See yet another tweet from @GabeAul.)

Q: Can I upgrade all of my PCs for free?

Yes, if they each have a qualifying OS version and edition installed. But installing on one device doesn’t give you rights to run Windows 10 on any other system, or move an OEM install to a virtual machine.

Q: Can I upgrade my phone?

This is all about Windows 10 for your x86 or x64 PC, not your Windows Phone. Microsoft will have more details about Windows for phones at some point later this year, when they talk about it being released. It won’t be available at the same time as Windows 10 for PCs and tablets.


What edition do I get?

Q: I have Media Center, K, N, Ultimate, or some other transient edition – what do I get?

Check out “What edition of Windows will I get as a part of this free upgrade?” on this page. If you have a K or N install, you will be upgraded to the parent edition for the K or N OS you are licensed for.

Q: When will I get the upgrade?

See “What happens when I reserve?” on this page. In general, once you reserve on that device, it’ll download automatically and you’ll be notified when it is ready to install, on or about July 29th, 2015.


What breaks if I upgrade?

Q: Can I still run Windows Media Center after I upgrade to Windows 10?

No. According to this page, if you upgrade a system that is running Media Center software to Windows 10, it will be uninstalled. If you use/love Media Center on a given system, I would strongly advise not upgrading to Windows 10 on that system, as it will be deleted.

Mass hysteria

Q: Is this thing running in my system notification area malware?

You might have malware, but the little flag running over there isn’t it. It’s just Microsoft working to get every qualified Windows install that they can to Windows 10 within a year’s time. Enjoy your free lunch.

Q: How do I stop users in my organization from installing Windows 10 on systems I manage?

If it’s a domain-joined Windows Pro system, or a Windows Enterprise system, have no fear. They aren’t getting prompted.

Q: How do I stop users in my organization from installing Windows 10 on BYOD systems I don’t manage?

If it is a system running Windows Home (or similar, like “Windows 8.1” with no suffix), or a Windows Pro/Professional) system that isn’t joined to the domain, and you don’t manage it in any way, you’re kind of up the creek on this one. This article provides info on KB3035583, which needs to be uninstalled to stop the promotion, and you’ll need to figure out a way to remove it on each of those systems.


Q: Microsoft will charge me in a year for updates, won’t they?

No. They won’t. Microsoft has stated that they will not charge for “free, ongoing security updates for the supported lifetime of the device.” Microsoft may well charge for a future upgrade to some other version of the OS. But I don’t see them going back on this as stated.


May 15

Be the toolmaker

We are toolmakers, humankind.

To resist this tendency to solve riddles, to complete tasks faster, with more efficiency, with less risk or human cost, is to resist our gift of ingenuity.

Humans are not born to be cogs. We are not born to be tools.

We are born to be toolmakers – to make the world better than we found it.

Making tools is not without risk or obligation, however. Efficiency often comes with financial benefit to the toolmaker, but human costs to those replaced by the tool.

The obligation isn’t to preserve the role of humans performing the menial tasks that toolmakers can, and gradually will, automate and replace.

The obligation is to lift up people affected by shifting tides of technology and efficiency, and help them to become toolmakers themselves.

To enable them to make their lives better due to advancing technology, not worse.

May 15

Farewell, floppy diskette

I never would have imagined myself in an arm-wrestling match with the floppy disk drive. But sitting where I did in Windows setup, that’s exactly what happened. A few times.

When I had started at Microsoft, a boot floppy was critical to setting up a new machine. Not by the time I was in setup. Since Remote Installation Services (RIS) could start with a completely blank machine, and you could now boot a system to WinPE using a CD, there were two good-sized nails in the floppy diskette’s coffin.

Windows XP was actually the first version of Windows that didn’t ship with boot floppies. It only shipped with a CD. While you could download a tool that would build boot floppies for you, most computers that XP happily ran on supported CD boot by that time. The writing was on the wall for the floppy diskette. In the months after XP released, Bill Gates made an appearance on the American television sitcom Frasier. Early in the episode, a caller asks about whether they need diskettes to install Windows XP. For those of us on the team, it was amusing. Unfortunately, the reality was that behind the scenes, there were some issues with customers whose systems didn’t boot from CD, or didn’t boot properly, anyway. We made it through most of those those birthing pains, though.

It was both a bit amusing and a bit frustrating to watch OEMs early on during the early days of Windows XP; while customers often said, “I want a legacy free system”, they didn’t know what that really meant. By “legacy free”, customers usually meant they wanted to abandon all of the legacy connectors (ports) and peripherals used on computers before USB had started to hit its stride with Windows 98.

While USB had replaced serial in terms of mice – which were at one time primarily serial – the serial port, parallel port, and floppy disk controller often came integrated together in the computer. We saw some OEMs not include a parallel port, and eventually not include a floppy diskette, but still include a serial port – at least inside – for when you needed to debug the computer. When a Windows machine has software problems, you often hook it up to a debugger, an application on another computer, where the developer can “step through” the programming code to figure out what is misbehaving. When Windows XP shipped, a serial cable connection was the primary way to debug.  Often, to make the system seem more legacy free than it actually was, this serial port was tucked inside the computer’s case – which made consumers “think” it was legacy free when it technically wasn’t. PCs often needed BIOS updates, too – and even when Windows XP shipped with them, these PCs would still usually boot to an MS-DOS diskette in order to update the BIOS.

My arrival in the Windows division was timely; when I started, USB Flash Drives (UFDs) were just beginning to catch on, but had very little storage space, and the cheapest ones were slow and unreliable. 32MB and 64MB drives were around, but still not commonplace. In early 2002, the idea of USB booting an OS began circling around the Web, and I talked with a few developers within The Firm about it. Unfortunately, there wasn’t a good understanding of what would need to happen for it to work, nor was the UFD hardware really there yet. I tabled the idea for a year, but came back to it every once in a while, trying to research the missing parts.

As I tinkered with it, I found that while many computers supported boot from USB, they only supported USB floppy drives (a ramshackle device that had come about, and largely survived for another 5-10 years, because we were unable to make key changes to Windows that would have helped killed it). I started working with a couple of people around Microsoft to try and glue the pieces together to get WinPE booting from a UFD. I was able to find a PC that would try to boot from the disk, and failed because the disk wasn’t prepared for boot as a hard disk normally would be. I worked with a developer from the Windows kernel team and one of our architects to get a disk formatted correctly. Windows didn’t like to format UFDs as bootable because they were removable drives; even Windows to Go in Windows 8.1 today boots from special UFDs which are exceptionally fast, and actually lie to the operating system about being removable disks. Finally, I worked with another developer who knew the USB stack when we hit a few issues booting. By early 2003, we had a pretty reliable prototype that worked on my Motion Computing Tablet PC.

Getting USB boot working with Windows was one of the most enjoyable features I ever worked on, although it wasn’t a formal project in my review goals (brilliant!). USB boot was even fun to talk about, amongst co-workers and Microsoft field employees. You could mention the idea to people and they just got it. We were finally killing the floppy diskette. This was going to be the new way to boot and repair a PC. Evangelists, OEM representatives, and UFD vendors came out of the woodwork to try and help us get the effort tested and working. One UFD manufacturer gave me a stash of 128MB and larger drives – very expensive at the time – to prepare and hand out to major PC OEMs. It gave us a way to test, and gave the UFD vendor some face time with the OEMs.

For a while, I had a shoebox full of UFDs in my office which were used for testing; teammates from the Windows team would often email or stop by asking to get a UFD prepped so they could boot from it. I helped field employees get it working so many times that for a while, my nickname from some in the Microsoft field was “thumbdrive”, one of the many terms used to refer to UFDs.

Though we never were able to get UFD booting locked in as an official feature until Windows Vista, OEMs used it before then, and it began to go mainstream. Today, you’d be hard pressed to find a modern PC that can’t boot from UFD, though the experience of getting there is a bit of a pain, since the PC boot experience, even with new EFI firmware, still (frankly) sucks.

Computers usually boot from their HDD all the time. But when something goes wrong, or you want to reinstall, you have to boot from something else; a UFD, CD/DVD, PXE server like RIS/WDS, or sometimes an external HDD. Telling your Windows computer what to boot from if something happens is a pain. You have to hit a certain key sequence that is often unique to each OEM. Then you often have to hit yet another key (like F12) to PXE boot. It’s a user experience only a geek could love. One of my ideas was to try and make it easier not only for Windows to update the BIOS itself, but for the user to more easily say what they wanted to boot the PC from (before they shut it down, or selecting from a pretty list of icons or a set of keys – like Macs can do). Unfortunately, this effort largely stalled out for over a decade until Microsoft delivered a better recovery, boot, and firmware experience with their Surface tablets. Time will tell whether we’re headed towards a world where this isn’t such a nuisance anymore.

It’s actually somewhat amusing how much of my work revolved around hardware even though I worked in an area of Windows which only made software. But if there was one commonly requested design change request that I wish I could have accommodated but couldn’t ever get done, it was F6 from UFD. Let me explain.

When you install Windows, it attempts to use the drivers it ships with on the CD to begin copying Windows down onto the HDD, or to connect over the network to start setup through RIS.

This approach worked alright, but it had one little problem which became significant. Not long after Windows XP shipped, new categories of networking and storage devices began arriving on high-end computers and rapidly making their way downmarket; these all required new drivers in order for Windows to work. Unfortunately, none of these drivers were “in the box” (on the Windows CD) as we liked to say. While Windows Server often needed special drivers to install on some high-end storage controllers before, this was really a new problem for the Windows consumer client. All of a sudden we didn’t have drivers on the CD for the devices that were shipping on a rapidly increasing number of new PCs.

In other words, even with a new computer and a stock Windows XP CD in your hand, you might never get it working. You needed another computer and a floppy diskette to get the ball rolling.

Early on during Windows XP’s setup, it asks you to press the keyboard’s F6 function key if you have special drivers to install. If it can’t find the network and you’re installing from CD, you’ll be okay through setup – but then you have no way to add new drivers or connect to Windows Update. If you were installing through RIS and you had no appropriate network driver, setup would fail. Similarly, if you had no driver for the storage controller on your PC, it wouldn’t ever find find a HDD where it could install Windows – so it would terminally fail too. It wasn’t pretty.

Here’s where it gets ugly. As I mentioned, we were entering an era where OEMs wanted to ship, and often were shipping, those legacy-free PCs. These computers often had no built-in floppy diskette – which was the only place we could look for F6 drivers at the time. As a result, not long after we shipped Windows XP, we got a series of design change requests (DCRs) from OEMs and large customers to make it so Windows setup could search any attached UFD for drivers as well. While this idea sounds easy, it isn’t. This meant having to add Windows USB code into the Windows kernel so it could search for the drives very early on, before Windows itself has actually loaded and started the normal USB stack. While we could consider doing this for a full release of Windows, it wasn’t something that we could easily do in a service pack – and all of this came to a head in 2002.

Dell was the first company to ever request that we add UFD F6 support. I worked with the kernel team, and we had to say no – the risk of breaking a key part of Windows setup was too great for a service pack or a hotfix, because of the complexity of the change, as I mentioned. Later, a very large bank requested it as well. We had to say no then as well. In a twist of fate, at Winternals I would later become friends with one of the people who had triggered that request, back when he was working on a project onsite at that bank.

Not adding UFD F6 support was, I believe, a mistake. I should have pushed harder, and we should have bitten the bullet in testing it. As a result of us not doing it, a weird little cottage industry of USB floppy diskette drives continued for probably a decade longer than it should have.

So it was, several years after I left, that the much maligned Windows Vista brought both USB boot of WinPE and also brought USB F6 support so you could install the operating system on hardware with drivers newer than Windows XP, and not need a floppy diskette drive to get through setup.

As I sit here writing this, it’s interesting to consider the death of CD/DVD media (“shiny media”, as I often call it) on mainstream computers today. When Apple dropped shiny media on the MacBook Air, people called them nuts – much as they did when Apple dropped the floppy diskette on the original iMac years before. As tablets and Ultrabooks have finally dropped shiny media drives, there’s an odd echo of the floppy drive from years ago. Where external floppy drives were needed for specific scenarios (recovery and deployment), external shiny media drives are still used today for movies, some storage and installation of legacy software. But in a few years, shiny media will be all but dead – replaced by ubiquitous high-speed wired and wireless networking and pervasive USB storage. Funny to see the circle completed.

May 15

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